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Branches

Disquisitional branches
Monodoxicology · Duodoxicology · Tridoxicology · Tetradoxicology · Pentadoxicology · Hexadoxicology · Septidoxicology · Octadoxicology · Nonodoxicology · Decadoxicology · Hendecadoxicology · Dodecadoxicology

Other branches
Omnimeneutics · Omniotics · Preppendology · Appendology

Main elements
Formulation · Antinomy · Authority · Composition · Consistency · Justification · Misquotation · Paratext · Readability · Redaction · Translation · Velitation · Omnidoxic authority · Criticism · Errancy · Fallibility · Inerrancy · Sequency · Coreliance · Epistemicity
Orientations
Manifestationism · Imprecisionism · Omnidoxitrism · Poeticism · Rhapsodicism · Compilationism · Non-compilationism · Definitionalism · Explorationalism · Monauthorialism · Prefigurism
In-text features
Metadiscipline · The Compilation · Disquisition · Discourse · Insentensation · Subsentensation · Insentence · Rubral · Subrubral · Surceasion · The Cosmos in The Universe · Capitalisation · Current Knowledge · Indexment · Indexa · Introductories · Paranotion
Related topics and terms
Omnidoxicologist · Post-omnidoxical · Pre-omnidoxical · Taylorian Omnidoxy · Rubrality · Transmuted Omnidoxy · Vestal Omnidoxy · Furtherafter · Furtherso · Furthestmost · Lattermentioned · Omnimentioned · Singlemost · One world · Mosthigh · Concept · Notion · Theory · Contemplation · Cometanic edition · Post-Cometanic edition

Monauthorialism, or to be in support of monauthoriality, is the belief orientation supporting the notion that a book with a sole author is superior to a book with multiple authors, and is usually invoked when The Omnidoxy is compared to books that have multiple authors, The Bible being one example. Monauthorialism acts as a basis orientation for conclusions made about the greater trustworthiness and accuracy of books that have a sole author compared with those that have multiple.

Throughout the history of philosophical, religious, and ideological writings, there are many instances in which pivotal books have been written by more than one author, but due to the fact that The Omnidoxy is monauthorial by its nature, the entire Millettarian Tradition stands in support of monauthoriality in comparison to polyauthoriality in the context of omnidoxical exegesis.

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